Mill Brook Preserve – Westbrook, 120 acres

Mill Brook Preserve features a 3-mile trail system (being expanded in 2017) opened in 2016 on 120 acres of forested land along Mill Brook in Westbrook. Mill Brook is notable for the largest annual migration of alewife fish from Casco Bay to Highland Lake. The fish migration can be seen while hiking along the trail in late May and early June. This secluded and hilly forest valley is peaceful and feels remote while just minutes from Maine’s largest urban center.

Please see below for the trail map and more information about the preserve and trails.

     Quick Trail Facts

  • Activities: hiking, running,  snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, viewing alewives
  • Length: 3.25 miles (expanding in 2017)
  • Difficulty: Moderate (South and North) to Difficult (Center)
  • Leave No Trace: Please take out whatever you bring in.
  • Largest alewife run in Casco Bay

     Trail Map (click to expand)

Directions to Trailhead

About the Mill Brook Preserve Trails

There are currently three trailheads that you can use to access the trails:

  • The primary trailhead is on Allen Knight Road, next to 789 Methodist Road.
  • The southern trailhead is on Perry Court next to 55 Perry Court.
  • The northern trailhead, named the MAGAN Trailhead, is across the street from Willow Drive (where parking is available) off of Route 302. Please use caution when crossing Route 302 to get to the trailhead)

The trail runs along the Mill Brook, crossing it in several places. The northern and southern sections are mostly flat and offer excellent opportunities to see alewives in late Spring and to catch scenic glimpses of the Brook and other wildlife year-round. The central section that connects them is for the more adventurous visitor, offering rugged climbs and traverses of steep hills above the water. Though close to Portland, the only noise you will hear throughout much of the trail is running water and wildlife.

Mill Brook runs from Highland Lake in Windham to central Westbrook where it empties into the Presumpscot River. As many as nine different fish species historically migrated to and from the ocean via the Brook, providing an important ecological link between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The return of alewives to the Brook is the first step in restoring that ecology.

Mill Brook Preserve is owned in fee by the Presumpscot Regional Land Trust.